‘Bottom Feeders’ by Jerry Roth – Review

*Disclaimer: I was given a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.*

***

Above the crackle of burning wood, a scream rose and curdled the blood within him. The tone of the cry cut into his spine with the precision of a sharpened blade. With his heart in his stomach, Ben ran to his home, trying to understand the reason for his pregnant wife’s screams. Frightened legs refused to move fast enough to satisfy his worried mind. Ben pushed his way into the front door, scraping the frame as he hurried. A sighted destined to scar Ben the rest of his life appeared before his as vibrant as a scene from a movie. Lily stood over their area-rug, knees locked together, and blood pooling under her until the beige colored rug turned an angry shade of crimson. The sight haunted his dreams for years to come without the clarity ever fading. When Ben reached his wife, she was shaking as he guided her onto a nearby chair. Her eyes were wide, filled with terror, and gone was any sense of reality. Ben waved a hand in front of her face and snapped his fingers. 

“Lily can you hear me? Please, Lily, talk to me? She turned her head to him – tears rolled down her cheeks. “What happened Lily?” She looked at the bloody carpet. 

“I was dusting, and it felt like my insides were ripping apart,” Lily said. Ben looked at her swollen belly and began to cry. 

 

Synopsis –

Jenny’s son is acting strange and drawing detailed pictures of bloody murders – she has reason to assume that her ex-husband may be to blame. Her new husband Robert has just taken up a new position as warden at the local prison that holds it’s own dark secrets. Finding a hidden diary that tells the tale of a depraved prisoner thought to be the Devil himself, Robert begins to see and feel supernatural happenings.

Mysteries abound, and chains can’t seem to hold the darkness in Jerry Roth’s Bottom Feeders.

 

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Thoughts –

From the first scene that sees a baby being born with no sign of an umbilical cord in sight, you know this novel is not playing nice. Bottom Feeders follows Jenny and her son Zack, along with her new husband Robert and her best friend Liam, as they discover dark secrets with dangerous consequences. Children are disappearing, children that her son is somehow connected with and Jenny has reason to believe it has something to do with her abusive ex-husband. Robert takes up his new post as prison warden only to discover that there is a prisoner living under the jail who should have been sent to the electric chair decades before. Only with the diary of his predecessor found in his enthralling and hypnotic new desk which offers not only old papers, but also new and terrifying visions.

Roth carries the separate story lines well within the book, keeping the reader interested in each thread by creating full and multi-layered characters. As the story progresses it’s clear that few of these characters are likeable but they are believable for the most part.

At times some motivations are not as clear as they could be, serious conversations seemingly erupting forth out of nowhere in otherwise everyday scenarios, yet it is true that each of the characters in this book are very serious themselves. Likewise, Jenny’s ‘evidence’ for her husband being involved in the nefarious goings on are flimsy even for such a deplorable man. But the story as a whole is populated by flawed, passionate characters, who whether you like them or not, you want to find out the end of their stories.

Riddled with twists, turns, and shadows, you will not be able to guess the ending of this novel, the heavy weights that tie all of the threads together. Bottom Feeders hooks you in with what may seem a straight forward path, but the sharps turns it takes you on will leave you shocked.

 

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Exploring the devil in humanity, and the humanity in Lucifer himself, Bottom Feeders spares few, and redeems even fewer.

 

About the Author –

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Jerry Roth is a graduate from The Ohio State University where he studied English Literature. He has written for Ohio newspapers and sports articles for the Disc Golf Pro Tour. His fiction career began as a screenwriter. He currently lives in Ohio with his wife Tricia and his three children Jesse, Lea, and Nick. After reading The Stand by Stephen King, he became passionate about creating his own work of fiction. Bottom Feeders is his debut novel.

 

Read and Review –

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Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

 

‘Butchers’ by Todd Sullivan – Review

*Trigger Warning (the book, not this review): vivid descriptions of violence, torture, and sexual violence*

 

Tonight, Min Gun brought his butchering tools.

He clung to the surface of a rough brick wall five stories up. A bone saw attached to his belt by a thin chain swayed gently in the autumn breeze. He had sheathed his machete on his back beneath a rolled rubber body bag. He gazed into the dark room across from him. Cheol Yu, the target, hadn’t left the building since he’d met Sey-Mi, a high school student wearing a plaid skirt and short sleeved white shirt. Somewhere, behind the opaque windows of the apartment, Cheol Yu was with her, alone. 

Min Gun’s superior, Jun Young, clung to the wall beside him. A wood-handled axe dangled in a leather sling at his side, his machete strapped to his waist. Where Min Gun carried a body bag, Jun Young had a leather weapon case strapped to his back. The company had tasked the two with arresting the suspect. Min Gun hoped Cheol Yu resisted enough so that he would be forced to kill him, saving him from months of torture. 

That would be his noble deed of the day. 

 

Synopsis –

Kidnapped, turned, and locked away in a concrete basement, high school student Sey-Mi is taught the ways of the damned. Her captors, beautiful and malignant, cruel and insane, torture her until she pledges allegiance to the Gwanlyo, a secret organization of vampires now obsessed with bringing her into their ranks. But has Sey-Mi really sworn loyalty to such an obscenely cruel organisation? Or will she side with the rogue agents hell-bent on bringing the Gwanlyo to their knees?

 

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Thoughts –

Set in the urban city of Seoul, South Korea, Butchers lives up to it’s harsh and violent name. Following Sey-Mi as her life is thrown into disarray Sullivan weaves a tale of brutality, power, and control. A seventeen year old girl chosen to join the ranks of the Gwanlyo, an ancient vampiric organisation that expects compliance to their rules and will employ the harshest of punishments for anyone foolish enough to cross them, fights to see her family again.

Sey-Mi is dragged into an immortal life that she never asked for and now has to serve a tyrannical organisation set on breaking her mind and making it there own. But if there’s one thing a teenage girl doesn’t like, it’s being told what to do. And Sey-Mi is not alone in her thoughts. There are other agents of the Gwanlyo that are sick of their rules and their torture. Sullivan brings us on a story of resilience, savagery, and deception.

There is no question that Butchers has a lot of violence, some of which could be characterised as gratuitous, or unnecessary, though the story and characters are strong enough to balance out the blood-shed. Sullivan’s writing flows well enough that the flashes of sadism do not overwhelm the plot – and you end up hating the Gwanlyo just as much as their victims.

 

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Butchers is an apt name for a novella chocked full of torture and tyranny, but behind the pain and the cruelty are those determined to stop it once and for all.

 

About the Author –

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Todd Sullivan took his first serious writing class in 1995 and has been writing ever since. In the early 2000’s Sullivan moved to Jeju, South Korea, where he taught English in the public school system for five years. He currently lives in Seoul, and is studying the Korean language at Yonsei University. He is also working on a speculative fiction/urban horror novel that takes place in Korea.

 

Read and Review –

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Amazon.co.uk

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‘Shepard’s Warning’ by Cailyn Lloyd – Review

*Disclaimer – I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.*

****

 

He froze.

The broad oak floorboards undulated, a low rumbling sound, the same sound he heard earlier, but louder, more pressing. The house shook and trembled as if the ground beneath the foundation were in the grip of an earthquake. It all happened in seconds. Tom stood, gripped by morbid fascination and fear. A dizzy, nauseous feeling swept through him. He bent over, thinking he would throw up. 

Another slamming door jolted Tom from his trance. He had to get the hell out of here! Jesus! The floorboards were clattering like a mad drum brigade. He turned and ran down the hall, toward the stairs. Ahead, door at the end of the long hallway pushed ajar – just an inch or two. Bright sunlight spilled through that crack and the keyhole, down the dark hallway, a surreal contrast between the sudden calamity indoors and the serene July afternoon outside. Cheerful birdsong, from beyond that door perhaps, completed the insanity. 

Drawn to the doorway like a moth to a lamp, he felt powerless to resist the attraction of whatever lay beyond the threshold. Light emanating from the room grew brighter and warmer. He drifted down the hallway, clenching his fists for a moment, trying to shake the anxiety, trying to regain his composure. The floorboards rattled beneath his feet, the ominous rumbling continued, danger lurked around him – but not beyond the door. He just knew it. 

He took a deep breath. 

Reached for the knob. Hesitated. 

Pulled the door open – 

 

 

Synopsis –

For years the abandoned MacKenzie mansion remained hidden in rural Wisconsin. Rumors and stories of apparitions, odd noises, accidents, and strange deaths in or near the property were enough to convince the townsfolk it was haunted and they stayed away.

Lucas MacKenzie and his brother Nate know nothing of this when they inherit the property and decide to bring their families to Wisconsin for a major renovation project with HGTV stardom in mind. As they tear out old fixtures and open shuttered windows, the house begins to reveal secrets of a terrible past and it soon becomes clear the MacKenzies are in grave danger. In the end, only one person can save them.

 

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Thoughts –

In Shepard’s Warning Lloyd crafts a story of tension mystery and more twists and turns than a roller coaster. Switching from multiple points of view the novel builds to a dizzying conclusion that satisfies the reader without playing into their expectations. Laura, the most frequented point of view in the book, carries the story through believable loneliness, seclusion, and disbelief towards the frightening and supernatural things that are happening to her, and perhaps through her.

With so many other characters however, at times some can seem more important than they actually are and there are loose ends and questions unanswered by the curtain close. But with the main characters and plot largely resolved, Shepard’s Warning delivers on its promise of a dark and intriguing story.

 

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With ancient magic, cautionary ghosts, generations of mysterious deaths, and a family crumbling, Shepard’s Warning delivers a dark story meaty enough to keep you hooked to the very end.

 

 

About the Author –

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In addition to writing, Cailyn Lloyd is an accomplished weather photographer and her work has appeared in several publications including Life Magazine and Time Magazine. She is also a composer and musician with three album releases to her credit. Cailyn lives near the Kettle Moraine State Forest in Wisconsin and when she’s not writing spooky stories, loves hiking with her children and dogs.

 

Read and Review –

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

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What’s your favourite ancient ghost story? Would you like to see more generational curses in your horror content? Let me know down below!

 

‘Metas’ by Rae Louise – Review

*Disclaimer – I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.*

****

The absinthe seared the back of Violet’s throat, setting her tastes buds alight. She felt it rushing like acid down her gullet and into her empty stomach. 

“Whoo!” Violet slammed the shot glass onto the bar, signalling the tender to bring over a second one. 

“Steady on, Vi, it’s still early,” Lucy cautioned, in her light-hearted manner. 

It may have only just gone 9 p.m., but it was Friday night and Cherry’s Bar was filling up fast. Piss-cheap beer, along with the free-shot-with-any-cocktail deal, made it a popular venue for university students; especially those psyching themselves up for Derby City Centre’s bigger pubs and clubs. Although the cocktails themselves were more juice than alcohol, and Violet had learned from experience that once you got over the excitement of free booze, it was fairly counterproductive. 

“Where after this?” she yelled, over the thudding beat of chart hits. “I’m in the mood for some serious boogying tonight!” 

“Carry on the way you’re going and you won’t be able to stand up, let alone dance around your handbag.” Another admonishment from Lucy.

A fresh shot glass filled with slime-green liquid was plonked on the bar in front of Violet, along with a milky-looking cocktail.

“I didn’t order this,” Violet told the barman. 

He pointed behind them to the seating zone that ran alongside the main window. Violet was only able to identify the mystery man because he was sitting alone. Slouched in a chair, one elbow draped over the back of it in a lackadaisical fashion, a dark-haired stranger had them in his sight. His face rippled with colour beneath the disco lights, which cast surfing rainbows over his black shirt. The scene induced a hallucinogenic kind of dizziness, and in the end Violet had to look away. 

“He bought this? For me?” she asked the barman, who clarified with a nod. She offered him some change to pay for the shot, but he waved a dismissive hand. 

“Call it a freebie with the cocktail,” he said. 

“What cocktail is it?” 

“Er, Screaming Orgasm.” 

Violet and Lucy glanced back at the stranger, then at each other. They erupted into unrestrained giggles. 

 

Synsopsis –

After the strange and unsolved death of her younger sister, Violet is spiraling into a pit of self-destruction. Not only is she drinking, but she’s started to black out and forget things, started to get an urge for violence that she never had before. So, when a group of strange individuals come offering answers not only to her lost nights, but also to what really happened to her sister, she follows gladly. But there’s something inside her that’s trying to get out. Can she push the darkness back, or will she use it to avenge her sister?

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Though not a classic ‘werewolf’ story, Metas is the reinvention of the struggle to contain and harness the animal within. An urban tale of heightened senses, mysterious groups hellbent on eradicating the problem, and a hunger that cannot be denied. Through broken friendships, stifled lovers, and secrets that would drive anyone insane, Louise brings the reader on a roller-coaster ride through the life of protagonist Violet

Violet is not a perfect hero – she gets her hands dirty on numerous occasions, a morally conflicted woman who was never given the tools to make the right decisions. She may be the least ‘human’ of all the characters in the book but she certainly has the complicated emotions and motivations of a human. She can brave, cowardly, kind to strangers, mean to those she loves, secretive and irrational and this is what makes the story so easy to get through. It was never a difficult task to turn to the next page. Metas gives you plenty to chew on.

I found Metas to be a visceral and multi-faceted story that wouldn’t be amiss on the big screen. The female monster story needs to come back to the forefront and this is a good place to start. Violet is an imperfect main character and one that you can’t always agree with, but you certainly can’t look away from. It’s bloody, it’s messy, there is no perfectly sculpted happy ending here, but plenty of bite.

 

About the Author –

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Rae Louise is a horror writer from the UK. Cultivating a love of darker stories from a young age, she studied movie makeup and prosthetics, as well as creating and selling gothic art. You can find her on GoodreadsInstagram and Facebook.

 

Links to Buy and Review –

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

Goodreads

 

What’s your favourite werewolf-esque horror story? Do we need more female werewolves? Who’s your favourite UK horror writer?

‘The Pale White’ by Chad Lutzke – Review

*Disclaimer – I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.*

****

 

It’s been dark for an hour and I’m the first one up. Usually am. I stare at the ceiling and pretend I’m somewhere else, pretend it’s all been a dream. It took about a week to get used to staying up all night, sleeping all day. We rarely get to bed before noon. That’s Doc’s doing. Nobody wants to rape a girl in broad daylight, the sun spotlighting their sin.

I turn on the lamp next to my bed and look over at the top of the stairs, where Doc puts our food. The same empty plates sit there, stacked and licked clean. It’s been like this for days. Not a crumb in sight. Being hungry is one thing, but when food is the highlight of your day, the days slow down and stretch into something tortuous, maddening. If it weren’t for Alex and Kammie, I’d have taken a broken bulb to my wrist months ago.

 

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Synopsis-

The Pale White is the story of how three young girls held captive in horrific conditions finally take their freedom back. But what happens when that door that’s been locked for so long opens up to a  they world no longer recognise. Can they regain their sanity and really live normal lives? And more importantly, can they do it together?

 

My Thoughts-

I neglected to read a synopsis or anything really about The Pale White before diving straight in and as someone who generally avoids any kind of sexual abuse in media, especially when it involves children, it was a real sucker punch for me to read that first chapter. That part was totally on me and not the fault of the author, but I would like to warn anyone considering this story that though there are no graphic descriptions of sexual abuse as it all happens before the story begins, it is alluded to and not sanitized at all so only read if you can handle the subject matter.

That being said, I think the handling of the incredibly sensitive subject matter is done well and shown through the eyes of one of the girls, gives a much needed human aspect to victims of this kind of abuse. A lot of stories I’ve read have victims of sexual abuse, whether they’re children or adults, as voiceless and unfortunately like tragic objects to pull at heart strings but not act as fully formed characters, and this is not so with The Pale White. Lutzke dove deep into the minds and lives of these girls for this rather short story and gives readers just a glimpse into what they have been forced through but also what they use to cope with that, the personalities that they desperately try to cling to as their captor relentlessly tries to stamp it out of them.

The sisterly nature and the care that these girls have for each other, the genuine love that they feel would bring a tear to anyone’s eye and I think it’s the grounding force for the story. Lutzke makes you care for the individual personalities and not just the fact that these are children in a dire situation – you care about them by name.

 

The Pale White is a heavy read but the story is in good hands with Lutzke. I think it draws attention to the every day horror that is a reality for far too many people, far too many of them children, and that most of us don’t have to think about. This type of thing happens far too often and is largely swept under the rug. All three girls are written with respect and reverence, and story of The Pale White‘s conclusion will not be easily forgotten.

 

About the Author-

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(Chad Lutzke hails from Battle Creek, MI. where he lives with his wife and kids. For over two decades, he has been a contributor to several different outlets in the independent music and film scene, offering articles, reviews, and artwork. He has written for Famous Monsters of Filmland, Rue Morgue, Cemetery Dance, and Scream magazine. His fiction can be found in a few dozen magazines and anthologies. He is known for his dark, heartfelt novellas which have been praised by Jack Ketchum, Stephen Graham Jones, James Newman, Cemetery Dance and his own mother. You can find him on Twitter, Goodreads, and over at his website.

 

 

Links to Buy and Review-

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

Goodreads.com

 

How do you feel about trigger warnings, do you prefer not to know? Should depictions of sexual abuse be sanitized for readers or should it be described in all it’s horrific detail? Have you read any of Chad Lutzke’s other books? Let me know down below!

‘The Last Book You’ll Ever Read’ by Scott Hughes – Review

*Disclaimer – I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.*

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Contents-

The Last Book You’ll Ever Read is a collection of 5 short stories from writer Scott Hughes. Ranging from the psychological horror of a tortured mind to the grotesque body horror of a man and some questionable cement, these five stories are fresh, modern, and oh so dreadful.

 

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The Last Book You’ll Ever Read is probably the shortest collection I’ve reviewed so far, but man does it pack a punch. The collection is well written, explores new and creative ideas rather than the usual horror tropes, and has a connecting thread that sandwiches the stories that really made me smile and genuinely creeped me out a little bit.

The beginning and ending portions are in second person point of view, as in ‘you get up, you see’, which is rarely used I find but in the right context can be very effective and in The Last Book You’ll Ever Read it is used to perfection. And the real meat of the sandwich explores psychological horror, body horror, and like any great anthology type series reminded me at times of The Twilight Zone or even Black Mirror in the way a couple of stories played out.

One particular story called ‘eXhaurio Inc.’ has stuck with me since I read the collection. It follows the story of a man seeing a ‘free’ computer advertised on television but when it arrives it isn’t like any computer he’s ever heard of, and soon he begins to pour his life into this computer, forgetting to eat and sleep. I was enthralled from the get go by this story and am not likely to forget it any time soon. I think we need more horror centered around technology and the devices that we use every day and how they mess us up sometimes more than the fictional monsters we all fear so much.

This is a short and sweet collection that is not one to be missed. If you are looking for well written and intriguing dark fiction stories to disturb you before bedtime, I would make The Last Book You’ll Ever Read, the last book you read before bedtime at the very least. I only wish there were more than five stories and I’ll be looking out for Scott Hughes name in the future.

 

About the Author –

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Scott Hughes is a writer from Georgia, USA. His fiction, poetry, and essays have been published in Crazyhorse, Carbon Culture Review, Strange Horizons and many, many more. Currently teaching English at Central Georgia Technical College, he lives with his two dogs Bacon and Pip, and is finishing up a YA novel called Red TwinYou can find Scott on Amazon, Goodreads, and learn more about his work over on his website here.

 

Links to Buy and Review

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

Goodreads.com

 

What’s your favourite horror story collection? Do we need to incorporate more technology into our horror fiction? What do you want the last book you ever read to be?

‘Grey Skies’ by William Becker- Review

*Disclaimer – I was given a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review*

 

“The crack of the thunder came from the dawning horizon as I dragged her corpse into the shallow hole where she would lie for the rest of eternity. Droplets of rain were beginning to bounce off of the tombstone, spraying against the tatters of the white dress still attached to her decaying grey skin. I had certainly underestimated how difficult it was to dig a proper grave. Unfortunately, the downpour that had begun to spew from the clouds above resulted in a shallow puddle inside of the grave, which turned the walls into mud. 

She was a nun, which went hand in hand with her foulness. On a stormy night in late spring, I was being forced to bury her. All I could remember were vague details about how I had found her and her name, Julie Hagwell. In the back of my mind there were blurry memories of me finding her mangled body resting in the grass outside of the church. Upon discovering the body, I dove into the building, screaming out for help, but everyone had disappeared. Not knowing what else to do, I took a set of bed sheets from inside, and used them to conceal her. I had known her as a friend of my ex-wife, and by the fact that she practically lived at Saint Elizabeth’s Catholic Church. 

Her body had been sliced and cut up with a blade, leaving her covered with deep gashes, the largest of which was on her neck. The woulds were all fresh, sending blood in puddles of rain that covered the lawn. It was clear that someone had murdered her, but who, and why?”

 

GREY SKIES CONTENT ADVISORY:

This story includes frequent swearing, mild blood and gore, body horror, intense imagery, mild sexual imagery, non-sexual nudity, and drug use. (The two bonus stories include the same as well as violence)

Synopsis:

Grey Skies is the novella length story of Roman Toguri and his descent into madness. Discovering the brutally murdered body of a nun in a church yard, he fails at burying the body and decides to take it home – and that is only the beginning of the bizarre events and questionable decisions that befall Roman.

The White Shade is a short story that takes a look at the motivations of a lone shooter, looking at his life before the event and the steps that take him there.

The Black Box is a short story that follows a boy propositioned by a strange man in a limo to cut some grass. Simple right? Maybe not…

 

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Grey Skies at the minute consists of a novella and two bonus short stories. The overall feel of the book is dark and surreal. The imagery is strong but the characters are less so. Plot is not a priority in these stories, it comes on the back foot after grotesque and harrowing images and shocking events.

 

Grey Skies

The first story is the longest and most confusing. It begins with the main character finding a dead nun and deciding to bring her home and if you think that has anything to do with the plot or that you’ll hear about that nun again – you are somehow wrong. Grey Skies describes in first person the descent into madness of a man who is struggling with his own guilt. The descent is not in any way slow, it’s more like a sheer drop off a very tall cliff, glimpses of feral creatures and mutated people in the little caves on the way down but no real explanation of what made him fall. You can piece together the story from reality that the odd events sometimes represent but for a lot of it there is little rhyme or reason to what Roman is experiencing. I think the most frustrating thing is that he seems to at times be aware of his own insanity, and at times not. This leads to absurd events happening and the main character reacting as though it is the only strange thing even after he’s tunneled out of his own bathroom, run from a human-spider hybrid, and inexplicably ended up on a cruise ship? He didn’t go to a cruise ship, he just appears there. I can’t say I enjoyed this story as it was long, random, and just a series of images. I don’t feel I learned anything about Roman’s character really except that he lost his mind – but that’s just not interesting enough to keep me invested in the story. I won’t be reading this again.

 

The White Shade

The first bonus story is the story of a lonely man who decides to take a gun to the store he works at and start shooting. There is an explanation from Becker at the end of the story that he wrote this when he was fourteen and he didn’t release it because he knew the backlash it would get. He states he doesn’t sympathize with mass murderers he just wanted to explore the thinking behind their actions. Unfortunately his qualifiers did not change my feelings about the story and the impression that the story gives stays the same. There isn’t even much of a dive into motivations, the guy seems fine, the isolation he feels is self-inflicted. Even the slights he feels from the people he interacts with could be easily brushed off. So of course he finds videos of the horrific torture of young women and doesn’t really like them, but watches them anyway? The lingering on female mutilation and brutality can’t easily be explained away and though I feel like the motivation was simply to draw shock and disgust from the reader, it felt unnecessary and told me nothing of the main character’s personality. It was too much for me at least, as was the explanation for the character’s own violence.

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The Black Box

The Black Box was again a confusing read. A young boy and his friends start a little lawn mowing business and a mysterious stranger in a limo stops by and asks them to cut his grass. The main characters father drops him off at this random man’s house and he stays there all day working, but when it’s time to get paid, there’s no one in the house to pay him. I don’t want to ruin the story but things go off the rails then, and there’s no explanation for anything. I understand wanting readers to work a little more, not to spoon feed, but there has to be a give and take, there has to be something there for the reader to find.

I would only recommend this to anyone looking for the bizarre and the absurd. It is certainly experimental and definitely stands alone, but you’ll have to work on your own to keep your motivation through these stories. In saying that, the creatures and description of images were great, but they alone do not a story make.

About the author:

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William Becker is an experimental horror fiction writer. His works focus on pushing readers to search for deeper meanings in his unfathomable tales. Writing his first novel ‘Weeping of the Caverns’ when he was just 14 years old, Becker is a self-published psychedelic dark fiction writer. You can find him on Instagram and Goodreads.

Links to Grey Skies – 

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

Goodreads

 

Are you a psychedelic horror fan? Do you prefer some order to a story? Or is the writing more important the actual plot? Let me know down below!